Dictionary Day

Dictionary Day

October 16. October 16th is Dictionary Day in honor of Webster’s birthday. Wrong Webster. That’s better. “On the first of May will be opened…a school, in which children may be instructed, not only in the common arts of reading, writing, and arithmetic, but in any branch of academic literature. “The little regard that is paid(…)

Nyerere Day – Tanzania

Nyerere Day – Tanzania

October 14. Julius Nyerere was born in 1922 just east of Lake Victoria in what was then Tanganyika. He herded sheep and “led a typical tribal life” in the village where his father was chief of a small tribe. He began school at age 12 and studied to be a teacher at Makerere University in(…)

Canadian Thanksgiving

Canadian Thanksgiving

Second Monday of October. Newfoundland and Nova Scotia each lay claim to Thanksgiving celebrations even older than the Pilgrims of Massachusetts. English navigator Martin Frobisher enjoyed a Thanksgiving meal on Baffin Island in 1578, and Samuel de Champlain established an “Order of Good Cheer” in 1606, after most of his men died out the previous(…)

Children’s Day – Brazil

Children’s Day – Brazil

October 12. It began with a two-foot tall sculpture. Headless at that. Three fishermen were casting their nets in the Paraiba River in Brazil. The year was 1717. Their nets were turning up empty until one of the fishermen pulled up a dark brown headless statue of a woman. Intrigued the fisherman cast his net(…)

Dia de la Raza

Dia de la Raza

October 12. On this day in 1492 two worlds collided. Mexican philosopher Jose Vasconcelos coined the term La Raza Cósmica, the Cosmic Race (for lack of a better word), to describe the people of Latin America, and what he considered the future of the human race. Vasconcelos theorized that: “the different races of the world tend(…)

Double Tenth – Taiwan/ROC

Double Tenth – Taiwan/ROC

October 10 Double Tenth (10/10) celebrates the anniversary of the Wuchang Uprising which brought down a centuries-old dynasty in 1911. Dozens of uprisings against the Qing Dynasty had failed between 1895 to 1911, most the work of small secret societies. What separated the Wuchang Uprising was that it originated from inside the Empire’s “New Army.”(…)